If you are a permanent resident outside Canada, you must show your valid PR card in order to board a flight or any commercial carrier to return to Canada. It is your responsibility to make sure your PR Card is still valid when you return from travel outside Canada and to apply for a new one before your current card expires.

If you are a permanent resident outside Canada who does not have a valid Permanent Resident Card (PR Card) to return to Canada, you may apply for a Permanent Resident Travel Documents (PRTDs).

Determine your eligibility

A travel document is issued to permanent residents abroad to provide proof to a transportation company that the holder is entitled to re-enter Canada as a permanent resident. A travel document is normally only valid for one single entry. You can apply for a permanent resident travel document if you:

  • Are a permanent resident,
  • Do not have a valid PR card showing your PR status,
  • Are outside Canada, and
  • Will return to Canada by airplane, boat, train or bus.
The Visa ConsultantCLICK HERE TO BOOK A CONSULTATIONNOWThe Visa Consultant

Travel Document

To apply for a travel document you need to prove:

  • Who you are;
  • Confirm your permanent resident status; and
  • Meet the residency obligation of a permanent resident.

Supporting Document:

  • Passport
  • Record of Landing (IMM 1000)
  • Confirmation of Permanent Residence (IMM 5292 or IMM 5688)

Residency requirement

You also need to meet the residency obligation of a permanent resident. 

If you have been a permanent resident for five (5) years or more

  • You have to be physically present in Canada for a minimum of 730 days within the past five (5) years.

If you have been a permanent resident for less than five (5) years

  • You have to show that you will be able to meet the minimum of 730 days of physical presence in Canada within five (5) years of the date you became a permanent resident.

The time you have spent outside Canada may be counted towards your residency obligation in the following circumstances:

Situation 1. Accompanying a Canadian citizen outside Canada

If you accompany your spouse, common-law partner or parent (if you are a child under 19 years of age) who is a Canadian citizen outside Canada.

You must provide supporting documents to prove that:

  • The person you are accompanying is a Canadian citizen; and
  • You are the spouse, common-law partner or child of that person.

Situation 2. Employment outside Canada

The time you have spent outside Canada may be counted towards your residency obligation if:

  • You are an employee of, or under contract to, a Canadian business or the public service of Canada or of a province or territory and
  • As a term of your employment or contract, you are assigned on a full-time basis to:
    • A position outside Canada
    • An affiliated enterprise outside Canada or
    • A client of the Canadian business or the public service outside Canada; and
  • You will continue working for the employer in Canada after the assignment.

Situation 3. Accompanying a permanent resident outside Canada

The time you have spent outside Canada may be counted towards your residency obligation if:

  • The person you accompanied is your spouse, common-law partner or parent (if you are a child under 19 years of age); and
  • He or she was employed on a full-time basis by a Canadian business or in the public service of Canada or of a province or territory during the period you accompanied him or her.

Humanitarian and compassionate grounds

If you cannot meet the residency obligation, you may still be able to keep your status as a permanent resident of Canada. You may assess your application on humanitarian and compassionate grounds. However, you must show that there were exceptional circumstances or factors beyond your control that have kept you living outside Canada.

Gathering Necessary Documentation

We are here to help! We’ll guide you to collect and compile every document needed for your application. Without a well prepared application and needed supporting documents, the processing of your application would not only be delayed, it could even be refused.